Tuesday, March 9, 2010

how does your garden grow....

Just in case you were curious.  This is a simplified version of how the garden magic happens.  I start with a one inch thick maple block and apply a thin layer of clear medium (beeswax and damar resin heated to 190 degrees on a hot plate).  After heat setting that layer (with a heat gun) I add color with an oil stick and apply a field of flowers using colored encaustic paints.  The whole thing is covered with a layer of clear medium and is heat set again. I carve in flower details (using a pin tool) and apply a layer of black oil stick over the entire piece and then use linseed oil to remove the excess and viola!  I know I've been away for a few days and thought you might enjoy a little peek into the process of encaustic painting.  My relationship with Spring was getting a bit rocky as each day starts with the loveliness of chirping birds and bright sunshine but then the clouds roll in, the sky darkens and brief periods of rain are interspersed with torrential downpours (and even hail) timed so that I have to pick up all three kiddos at separate schools each day.  This was becoming more bothersome and I was really beginning to think that it was wrong of Spring to let me down like this and how she should really meet me 1/2 way until I realized that it wasn't her fault. The heat of Summer and cold, sleet and snow of Winter arrive quickly and sit right down for an extended visit.  But  Spring and Fall are gypsies, travelers, explorers who are more about process than product (which is why i love them so). Spring and Fall sneak in and begin to transform things and before you know it they're gone.  So in the spirit of spring I'm sharing a process today which will lead to a give away tomorrow...   

11 comments:

Dyche Designs said...

Loved seeing your work in progress. :0)

Elizabeth said...

Thanks for demystifying the process. I am not into the spring mood yet. We still have a lot of snow but if the calender speaks the truth spring will begin within the next two weeks.

Let's hope so.

justagirl said...

oh wow... thanks for showing the process it was so interesting. I loved what you said about spring and fall, it is so true, sadly true... and thanks for your words on my blog.x

Angela Mobley said...

I love the depth this process produces in the final product. I'd love to try it.

tangled sky studio said...

thanks for the kind comments. i wanted to mention that this was just a little sample to show the basic process. typically there are 4-8 thin layers of wax on a finished piece and each one is "fused" to the layer beneath. this piece was heated up, scraped back and will become tomorrow's give away!

gretchenmist said...

beautiful post. thanks for sharing your process ~ the black adds so much. i've been admiring the garden details in your work :)

the nest said...

Thank you for the behind the scenes process description. It is such a labourious process. I love that garden...

I really like your seasons analogy; I tend to agree, my fleeting favorites too. Thinking about putting sweet-peas in the ground this week! Yippee!

nacherluver said...

Oh boy! First a peek at your process, then a chance at a give-a-way???
I don't know if I can contain myself!!!
AAAAaaaaaaaaKkkkkkk!!! (jumping up and down with excitement)
Shoot. I failed!
Love your work :)
Thank you for your blog and all you offer!

Lynda Howells said...

Love your work, l just stumbled upon your blog and so glad l did. L am just experiment with this technique, so thank you for this blogxxlynda

artslice said...

What a killer - all 3 kids at different schools.
The painting process is ever-intriguiging to me... I'm tuning in for the give-away!

Cathy Nichols Art said...

Thank you, Beth, for this beautiful glimpse into your studio process -- and for the idea that "spring and fall are gypsies, travelers and explorers." Lovely!